Sex, gender and medicine

Two minds

The cognitive differences between men and women

Pursuing parity

A new generation of female faculty is gathering data on why there should be more of them



Upfront is a quick look at the latest developments from Stanford Medicine

Collaboration station

The new Center for Digital Health will bring together faculty and Silicon Valley technology companies.

Old drugs, new tricks

A combination of two cancer drugs, in mice, is effective at preventing death from dengue and Ebola.

Tuskegee's legacy

Disclosure of the syphilis study in 1972 correlates with an increase in in medical mistrust and mortality among African-American men.

Pain gain

In mice, a drug that blocks the opioid receptors in the pain neurons outside the brain and spinal cord appears to counteract two of the most problematic side effects of opioids while still allowing effective pain relief.

Tumor sentinels

Researchers engineer T cells to track the progress of immunotherapy.

The 1-cent lab

Scientists have developed an inexpensive, reusable system to conduct laboratory tests.

3-D anatomy

A patient with previous heart surgery becomes the first at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital to benefit from new imaging software.

The Backstory

All due respect

Breaking the cycle of med student mistreatment


Wildly frugal

As part of his quest to make science tools available to everyone, everywhere, Manu Prakash has invented a $1 microscope, a $5 chemistry set and a 20-cent centrifuge. His next goal? Creating a $100 scanning electron microscope.


Insurance policy

Health insurance began as a method of protecting patients and keeping hospitals afloat. Then it became a for-profit industry. An excerpt from An American Sickness.

In Brief

Think typing

People with disabilities demonstrate the fastest, most accurate typing to date using only their brains to control an on-screen cursor

In Brief

Memory lane

Want to recall things as well as a memory athlete? You can, if you learn a mnemonic technique called the method of loci.

Other Issues

Stanford Medicine magazine is published four times a year, and each issue focuses on a specific topic.