Diagnostics

The power and limits of zeroing in

Hearing things

Solving the mystery of why some people can hear their eyeballs move

Good sport volumehigh

The passion of anti-doping chief Travis Tygart

TB crush

Video gamers help develop a better test for tuberculosis

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Upfront

Upfront is a quick look at the latest developments from Stanford Medicine

Unblinded

Researchers have restored partial vision in mice with completely severed optic nerves. The work could pave the way for vision restoration in humans.

Pain relief

Scientists have identified a compound that, in mice, provides the same painkilling power as opioids without the overdose risk.

Taking steps

A stem cell treatment helps stroke patients regain motor function.

In the can

A large study settles the question of whether eating certain canned foods increases your exposure to bisphenol A.

Doctors mum on genital cutting

A study in Egypt shows that one-third of women are uncertain about having their daughters undergo genital cutting — a traditional but illegal practice — and doctors aren’t dissuading them.

Innovation hub

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is funding a $600 million Biohub, which will bring together researchers from the three major Bay Area universities to study biotechnology.

Forget it

Estrogen therapy after menopause won’t refresh your memory.

Comprehensive cancer care

The National Cancer Institute has designated the Stanford Cancer Institute as a Comprehensive Cancer Center, its highest designation.

The Backstory

No limit?

Sickle cell trait — one copy of the gene variant — carries less risk of death from overexertion than scientists previously thought.


Plus

Fever pitch

Nancy Snyderman traveled to Liberia to cover the Ebola epidemic. That was nothing compared to what happened when she came home.

Plus

The dealer is in

When Anna Lembke began working as a psychiatrist in the late 1990s, she told the clinic’s intake coordinators not to send her any patients with addiction to drugs or alcohol. What she soon discovered was that she had no one left to treat. An excerpt from Drug Dealer, MD.

In Brief

State of mind

The brain areas that are altered during hypnosis, and what they mean.

Other Issues

Stanford Medicine magazine is published four times a year, and each issue focuses on a specific topic.

Summer 2016

Strive, thrive and take five

The science of well-being

Spring 2016

Relationships

Ties that heal

Winter 2016

Precision health

On medicine's frontier